One is required to write a thesis at the end of an undergraduate course of study, or at the end of a postgraduate year. A thesis is a reasonably long piece of writing that contains a hypothesis, which the student develops during an entire course of study.


Consider what was covered since your freshman year. Make a list of all the essays, projects, exams, quizzes, and courses you took.


Add substance to the list by writing a brief description of each examination, quiz, test, essay, and paper. A plan must be created from the result of this summary.


Analyze your topic and discuss it with your supervisor. It must incorporate a hypothesis. It must also be expertly worded in a way that embraces the salient points of the ground you have covered.


Gather as much as you can in the way of up-to-date references such as books, articles, journal entries, websites, and other scholarly material. Some of it will be familiar and vital.


Reserve a liberal length of time to cover the required reading.


Take plenty of notes and start to draft the thesis, using revised material with a fresh slant and taking new perspectives on covered ground.


Draft the introduction last. This method provides the opportunity to introduce your work in an appropriate way, and devise an effective and well-written hypothesis.